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Otherworldly Images Of Iceland’s Recent Volcanic Eruption

Otherworldly Images Of Iceland's Recent Volcanic Eruption

Rescue team volunteers are on hand to assist guests and inform them of any danger as lava flows through a new fissure following a volcanic eruption in the Meradalir Valley on Iceland’s Reykjanes Peninsula on Aug. 3, 2022. (Ernir Eyjolfsson/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

  • Iceland’s Fagradalsfjall volcano began spewing magma again on Wednesday.
  • The volcano lay dormant for more than 6,000 years before 2021, when it erupted for six months.
  • Photos show the otherworldly landscape as the volcano once again ejects magma.

Iceland’s Fagradalsfjall volcano began spewing magma again on Wednesday, just eight months after its last eruption ended.

Video from Wednesday showed magma shooting from a narrow fissure about 109 to 218 meters long near cooled lava from last year’s eruption.

(LAKE: Erupted for months and spewed magma again)

The volcano is located in southwestern Iceland in the uninhabited Meradalir Valley on the Reykjanes Peninsula, about 20 miles from Reykjavik. The nearby Keflavik airport remained open and no flights were interrupted.

Three tourists were injured at the volcano Wednesday night, although the injuries, including a broken ankle, were not serious, the New York Times reported. The Icelandic Meteorological Bureau urged people to stay away from the volcano.

Volcanologist Magnus Tumi Gundmundsson told the Associated Press that the eruption appears small, and the Icelandic government said the risk to populated areas and infrastructure was low.

“But we don’t know where things are in the process,” Gundmundsson clarified.

A series of earthquakes shook the peninsula in the week leading up to the eruption, leading scientists to expect an eruption to occur soon.

The same area erupted from March to September 2021. Before the 2021 eruption, Fagradalsfjall had been inactive for over 6,000 years and had not erupted on the Reykjanes Peninsula in nearly 800 years. Hundreds of thousands of tourists flocked to see the spectacular site during the six-month lava flow.

Iceland has an eruption every four to five years on average, because it is located where two tectonic plates diverge, making it a volcanic hotspot in the North Atlantic Ocean. The most disruptive eruption in recent times was the Eyjafjallajokull volcano, which erupted in 2010 and hampered air traffic for days, grounding more than 100,000 flights.

Click through the slideshow above to see the alien landscape as Fagradalsfjall radiates magma again.

MORE FROM WEATHER.COM: How a photographer captured a volcanic eruption under the northern lights

The eruption began on the evening of March 19, 2021. This photo was taken in downtown Grindavík, the city closest to the volcano, during the early morning hours of March 20.  The glow of flowing lava can be seen reflecting off the clouds above the volcano.  (Chris Matthew)

The eruption began on the evening of March 19, 2021. This photo was taken in downtown Grindavík, the city closest to the volcano, during the early morning hours of March 20. The glow of flowing lava can be seen reflecting off the clouds above the volcano. (Chris Matthew)

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